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5 Reader Recommended VO Podcasts Not to Miss

podcast largeThe previous two posts (12 Voiceover Podcasts You Should Not Miss Part 1 and Part 2) focused on podcasts I thought would be interesting for your voiceover business. Listenable, VO goodness easily enjoyed by strapping on a pair of earbuds.

Recommendations you left in the comment section of those posts and other social forums opened my eyes to new content. Most I’d not heard of, so I was eager to give them a listen. I was presently surprised.

Here are the recommendations readers provided, complete with a link to each podcast. I hope find one or two that’ll be perfect additions to your podcast list.

Andy Boyns, suggests The Person Behind the Voice. This podcast is a series of conversational interviews with voice artists and others involved in the voiceover industry. Conversations highlight the many different ways people have advanced in their chosen profession, and serve to remind us when challenging the demons within that others have probably had similar experiences. Andy is the producer of this entertaining series.

 

From Canada, Garnet Williams recommends the podcast he and fellow voice artists Dave McRae and Mike Pongracz produce, called The AmiVOs & Friends “Super-Funtastic-Happy-Hour VOdcast.” The 3 AmiVOs offer entertaining and educational episodes in a delivery that’s informative while laid back. Expect a smorgasbord of news, tips, interviews and humor. Each show offers a 3AmiVO’s Iceberg Tip or Fun Fact!

 

Mike Broderick thinks highly of the 3AmiVOs as well, saying their podcast is “hilarious!” He also highly recommends Love That VoiceOver with Rebecca Michaels. Reader, Justin, also suggests Love That VoiceOver, commenting, “Rebecca interviews folks from all parts of the industry, and I’ve found her interviews with agents and producers to be professionally informative, and her interviews with talent to be inspirational as well as entertaining.”

 

Trisha Beausaert, Voices.com Public Relations Manager, let me know about VoxTalk, which is back from a 5 year hiatus. This podcast is described as valuable programming for both aspiring and professional talents. Each multi-segment episode features guest contributors and covers business, news, technology and many other areas relative to the voiceover profession. The repository of previous episodes contains many gems and is worth investigating.

 

One of my new Facebook friends, Joseph Bevilacqua, produces The Voice Actor Show podcast, and he recommends that you check it out. In the most recent episode, Joe and his wife Lorie interviewed voice actor Fred Frees, and featured a number of clips of voice acting geniuses from the past several decades. Included in the mix are cuts from several popular radio drams and comedies.

 

It was fun to hear from so many readers who had comments about what I’d recommended and to hear about new podcasts I hadn’t considered. There was one other suggestion and I’m going to use it as the seed for an upcoming blog post.

If I’ve missed a podcast related to voiceover, directly or indirectly, I’d like to hear from you.  Leave a comment below.

© 2014 J. Christopher Dunn

 

Other posts you might find interesting:

Your Next Client Could be a Return Call Away

The Disturbing Voice Disappearance

Are You Available?

 

12 Voiceover Podcasts You Should Not Miss (Pt 2)

Previously in part one of 12 Voiceover Podcasts You Should Not Miss, I introduced you to six podcasts to educate and inspire you about voiceover. I’m amazed at the amount of FREE information available through podcasts and I always feel listening to them is time well spent. I can’t think of another way to get educated passively.

This post continues with the second half of my recommended list.

 

Voice Coaches

mza_6385187628270560378.170x170-75Sometimes this podcast is too short. Warren Garling and Chris Scharling find topics that could use more time. They’re that interesting. They entertain well together and discuss methods to improve your VO business. From insightful interviews with industry professionals to marketing tips, and professional suggestions, each episode is delivered with humor and openness. Make sure to listen to the entire podcast for hilarious outtakes.

 

The Producers Podcast – Voiceover and Radio / Audio Production

mza_8350867020232262915.170x170-75While Ryan Drean’s professional focus is Country Imaging services at TM Studios, 360 Country, he is one guy that has many audio interests. His podcast is a blast to listen to and his easy going approach with the professionals he interviews gets answers and stories seldom heard elsewhere. Ryan talks with producers, voice talent and other audio industry professionals.

 

VO Minute

ps.jqrxbgqm.170x170-75New to the voiceover biz? Been in it for a while? This podcast is just right for you. Host and Voice Actress Allison Moffett provides useful VO tips; suggestions for improving your studio business; tech info and personal experiences in bite sized episodes. Allison’s bubbly, upbeat delivery is fun to listen to and sure to be one of the most positive parts of your day.

 

Voice Acting Mastery: Become a Master Voice Actor in the World of Voice Over

Known for numerous video game credits, Voice Actor, Crispin Freeman is the go to guy when your interest is voice acting in animation and video games. He’s been in the business for close to three decades and has the expertise to answer your most pressing voice acting questions. Interviews with agents, voice actors, and producers are typical of what you’ll find in his biweekly podcast.

 

Voice Over Experts

One of the first podcasts I subscribed to is provided by the folks at Voices.com. I was looking for a repository of stories from industry professionals, people who were successful in what they do. I wasn’t disappointed and found each episode enlightening and educational. What happens when you have too much radio in your sound? Check out this podcast for the answer.

 

Voice Over Marketing Podcast

When your VO business could stand an injection of marketing know-how, John Melley delivers what you’ll be looking for. You love what you do otherwise you wouldn’t be doing it, right? Learn to make more money and REALLY love what you do. John has useful information specific to your business that’s easy to access and a pleasure to hear.

 

I’ve received a number of suggestions since I published part 1 of this two part post and will share them with you next time. If you have a favorite podcast that helps you with your voiceover business respond in the comments section with your suggestion.

© 2014 J. Christopher Dunn

 

Other posts you might find interesting:

Your Next Client Could be a Return Call Away

The Disturbing Voice Disappearance

Five Ways to be Remembered by Your Clients

 

 

12 Voiceover Podcasts You Should Not Miss (Pt 1)

podcaste_captureWhen I’m working around the house or have a few moments of free time, one of the things I enjoy is listening to Podcasts. I listen to what I think is an eclectic mix that ranges from The Adam Carolla Show to Protocol Radio to NPR: Pop Culture Happy Hour. I like variety.

Since I’m a voice actor I listen to a number of Podcasts for inspiration and some to help me grow my business. I currently have a dozen I listen to weekly. The producer or host of each one takes on a specific approach to influencing me about voiceover or audio. In no particular order, here are the first 6 of my recommendations.

 

East West Audio Body Shop

mza_5479188260430693820.170x170-75Monday evenings would end miserably without watching this live, streaming vid-cast with hosts Dan Lenard and George Whittam. Their hour long VO-centric show features interviews with celebrities, hardware reviews, information and opinions. LOTS of opinions. If you miss the live stream, you can grab the audio portion through Podcast and listen to what you missed.

 

Voice Over Cafe

voice over cafeLooking for a place to kick back, enjoy a virtual bean beverage and hear about talented voice actors? Stop by the Voice Over Cafe. VO Hosts Terry Daniel and Trish Basanyi along with appearances by Tom Dheere, Peter Bishop, Sean Caldwell and Rob Sciglimpaglia have the scoop on current VO happenings. Recent episodes featured an interview with Susan Bennet (the first voice of SIRI) and an in depth chat about IpDTL, an alternative to ISDN.

 

Home Recording Show

Home Recording Show

This weekly podcast covers a lot of home recording ground. While it’s specific to musicians, I find the range of topics fascinating and occasionally they align with what I do in my studio. Microphone suggestions, DAW recommendations, and audio manipulation are often discussed. One of my favorite segments focuses on song remixing. Veteran hosts Ryan Canestro, Jon Tidey and Jesse Zoller have years of combined talent and studio expertise.

 

Talkin Toons with Rob Paulsen

Talkin Toons with Rob PaulsenWhat do Yakko Warner, Pinky, and Dr. Otto Von Scratchansniff have in common? They are characters voiced by Emmy and Annie award winner Rob Paulsen for the Animaniacs cartoon series. Rob brings his craziness, voices and in depth guest interviews to this amazing podcast. If you have even the slightest interest in animation voice acting, this is THE podcast to laugh with.

 

The Sound Advice Voice-Over Podcast

The Sound Advice Voice-Over PodcastIt’s valuable to be aware of multiple perspectives about voiceover. Questions sometimes get the same answer no matter who is asked. What are the benefits of pay to play sites? Is there a valid replacement for ISDN? Who is John Florian and what’s his deal? What’s a slate and how should it be used? Host Kate McClanaghan reveals the answers to questions like these with her unique, cut to the chase insight.

 

Music Radio Creative

Music Radio CreativeNow that you have a smokin’ VO business (or at the very least are on your way to one) it’s time to think about creating your own podcast. Mike and Izabela Russell open the mic and take a deep dive into podcast creation, networking, creating audio apps, Internet radio and more. The advice given and topics covered will inspire you to find ways in which they can be applied to VO.

 

These will get you started and probably wanting more. Come back for part 2 of my Podcast playlist in my next post.

Tell me what your indispensable podcast is and I’ll post all the suggestions in an upcoming post.

© 2014 J. Christopher Dunn

 

Other posts you might find interesting:

Your Next Client Could be a Return Call Away

The Disturbing Voice Disappearance

Are You Available?

 

The Disturbing Voice Disappearance

MouthShot_150x150Early yesterday morning I discovered my voice had checked out. Speaking was no longer possible.

Concerned, I opened my mouth and the attempt to say what was in my head, “Hey, what’s going on here?” was futile. I laid there silent. My heart was making up for the lack of sound with hard pounding in my ears. Shaking my entire body, it felt like it might jump right out of my chest.

Thinking maybe I was parched and my vocal cords needed a splash of lubrication, I got up from bed and went to the kitchen for a drink of water.  After the drink, I formed a small question in my mind and then engaged in what I hoped to be my first words of the morning, “Have I lost my voice?”

Silence. Still nothing. My ability to speak was gone.

Concern ratcheted up to full-blown panic as multiple, unanswered questions raced through my mind. Since I rely on the use of my voice to make a living, the biggest question was, “What am I going to do, now?”

With a refill of water, I moved over to the kitchen table, grabbed a chair and sat. My head in my hands and fingers running through my hair, I made a mental list of tasks to take care of when the rest of the world is up and moving. Call the doctor being the first.

I downed the second glass of water and tried to speak again. “What am I going to do!?” I heard the words in my head but my outside voice was gone. Checked out.

If my primary tool to earn a living went AWOL, what other skill or talent could I rely on to put food on the table? I came up with a number of freelance possibilities including audiobook editor, photographer, blogger, personal cook, weed puller, dog walker and mime.

They all seemed somewhat pale in comparison to being a voice actor. I’ve learned to express emotions through my voice. Now the best I could do is facially emote and gesticulate, two things I do well in the booth. But, take those talents outside the booth, I know I’d be tossed into the house of crazy.

What seemed like hours had only been moments at most. My head was still full of questions like, “What have I done?”

The kitchen blurred and then dissolved as I found myself in bed, looking at the dresser on the other side of the room. My heart was still loud in my ears and continued to shake my body. After a moment, the fog cleared and I uttered in a whisper, “It was only a dream.”

Could you reach deep inside and find something worth your attention and passion if you lost your voice, or the primary tool for making your living? What would you do?

© 2014 J. Christopher Dunn
Image by patricia m

 

Other posts you might find interesting:

Your Next Client Could be a Return Call Away

Five Ways to be Remembered by Your Clients

Are You Available?

The Magic Phrase that Pays

 

 

magical moneyThere is a small two-word phrase that carries much force. The utterance of these words could make you a hero in a child’s’ eyes. Saying these words to big macho men could melt their hearts. If you said this to your mom, she’d smile, knowing that she taught you well. Telling this phrase to your clients will let them know you appreciate their business.

Imagine a scenario where you work hard to get the business of a recognized client. You establish a professional relationship, and find that working with them is nothing short of amazing. They appreciate your creativeness and suggestions, then give you glowing praise for your finished audio. You work hard throughout the process and get paid exactly what you quoted.

You then move on to your next conquests. You’re feeling good about the growth your client list has experienced. You notice, however, that your business is not really growing much. Your revenue compared to last year is the same. No growth. Hmmm… You worked hard to get new clients, but what happened after project completion?

Did you forget about those clients you worked so hard to get? Did you say the magic phrase that pays? You know, Thank You! That’s right, THANK YOU. Most people like to be thanked, and your clients are people. Showing your gratitude for doing business with them will help keep you in mind for their next project.

There are a number of ways to say thank you. The easiest is to send a note card with a short, handwritten message telling your client how much you appreciated being hired to do the voiceover or narration for their project. Easy. It doesn’t have to be huge, one or two sentences will get your message across.

If writer’s block is getting in the way of sending a thank you card, check out any of the following four sites for inspiration.

Thank You Note Examples & Note Writing Tips

The Letter Barn\Thank You Letters

Thank You Notes

Thank You Note Samples

A thank you card could be one of the first follow-ups you make with your client after completing a project. I recommend sending it about a week after they’ve received final audio.

Another way to express thanks is a note of appreciation to clients for their interest and consideration in using your voice in their projects. Maybe send this four to six months later, either e-mail or traditional USPO mail. Keep them thinking of you. Stamp out client neglect.

Thank you for reading my post. I appreciate it. The magic phrase is Thank You! Help spread the phrase.

© 2014 J. Christopher Dunn


 

Other posts you might find interesting:

Your Next Client Could be a Return Call Away

The Delicious Taste of Frog

Are You Available?

The Delicious Taste of Frog

Froggy

In a previous post, I detailed a method on how to work through the items in your e-mail inbox. If you missed it, the link below will take you to the article.

Your Inbox Needs a Timeout!

After spending time in your inbox, identify the one item you need to do today no matter what, and do it. This could be your most important or most difficult task. A project you need to finish.

Doing the most difficult thing in the morning will make the rest of your day breeze by with what seems like less effort. “Eat That Frog!” is the title of self-help guru Brian Tracy’s book, which details the strategy of taking care of the most important task before tackling the rest of your day.

Difficult could have multiple meanings. The task could be difficult because of complexity. On the other hand, a task that you don’t want to do and dread even the thought of, could be another meaning. Important tasks have a level of stress attached to them and with that, could become a difficult task to start. Whatever the hesitation, this is the thing you want to work on first. Maybe, think of it like when you were a youngster and were told that you had to eat your veggies before you could enjoy your dessert. Make sense?

My time for eating the frog is right after I finish processing my e-mail. I take 30-minutes and do everything I can to complete the task. Depending on how much of the task is left, and if completion is not necessary on the same day, I’ll do as much as I can and work on it again the following day. Some frogs are bigger than others.

My frogs will look different from yours but here are a few I swallowed this past week.

  • Monday – Followup phone call to slow paying client
  • Tuesday – Cold call to prospective client from a major corporation
  • Wednesday – Pay studio bills
  • Thursday – Compile business performance data for the month
  • Friday – migrate archived work from the past 4-years to a new backup drive

Fortunately, these were on the small side and none hopped over to the following day. Each of them, however, had me feeling anxious and wanting to postpone the task.

Imagine completing that nasty list item first thing in the morning and how relaxed and less stressed you’ll feel the rest of the day. Your mind will be free to contemplate other, more enjoyable parts of your day. You’ll feel like a big helium balloon has lifted your creative spirit to a new height.

There are going to be things you just don’t want to do on any given day. Like these tasks, eating a frog doesn’t sound like much fun. Of course, the alternative is to ignore the frogs until they’ve managed to multiply and take over your life with their incessant croaking. You’re much better off to eat the frog before that happens.

© 2014 J. Christopher Dunn
Photo by bethcoll

Other posts you might find interesting:

Your Next Client Could be a Return Call Away

Five Ways to be Remembered by Your Clients

Are You Available?

10 Ways to Keep Your Clients from Falling Through the Cracks

under construction siteDo your business skills keep your clients form shopping elsewhere for their next voiceover need? Have you done the due diligence to develop your client relationships? Do you occasionally correspond with your clients to remind them about your services?

If you answered “no” to any of the above questions, you might be guilty of client neglect. Or worse yet, your voiceover business could become a casualty of unhealthy professional relationships, with many of your clients falling through the cracks.

Feel Good Clients

Feel good about your clients and the relationship you develop with them. Clients are what feed your business growth and without them there would be very little kibble in the cat’s dish. Not only are they cutting a check for your resonate tones and script interpretation, they are buying your voiceover brand.

  1. They’re Only Human

Working with clients can be unsettling because professional boundaries are important to maintain. Should I try to be more amusing than (I think) I am? Should I be stiff, overly stuffy and business like? Maybe I ought to distance myself from my clients and just do the work?

For me, it’s easiest if I’m just myself and treat the people I work with as fellow humans. Clients seem to like that.

  1. Ask, Don’t Assume

While you’re building client relationships, keep in mind that it’s a give and take process. You are learning about your client’s business and their voiceover needs. Be an active listener.

Ask questions that will help you become more knowledgeable and better prepared once work begins. Don’t assume because it can make an ass out of u and me.

  1. No Butt Kissing

I know when I’m being unnecessarily flattered or too extensively complimented by somebody trying to gain my trust or approval… and I don’t like it. Your clients won’t like it either.

  1. Quality vs. Quantity

Would you rather be known as the talent who does amazing work and is well worth the asking price; or would you settle for being known as the talent who is super inexpensive?

Do not take every job that comes your way, even just starting out. Focus on how well you can complete a project, not how low you are willing to drop your price to get the job.

Harvard Business professor Michael Porter states you can hold a competitive advantage in only one of two areas: price or quality. Play to your strengths, develop impressive voice acting skills, run your studio like the business you’ve always imagined, and you’ll never be forced to compete on price again!

  1. Know when to Say No

Just because a client wants your voice, does not mean your talents and skills are a good fit for their project.

A few years back, I was asked to do an opener for a music show that was in development. The producer was hooked on the “sound” of my voice and after our initial conversation I felt the job was WAY out of my wheelhouse. They were looking for something I was not. However, I was too full of myself to pass on the gig so I moved forward with the session.

After my first attempt I received this reply, “…like YOUR voice but need Hiphop grit.” While adding grit in my second take (which was similar to adding cotton balls to chocolate cake) I knew I wasn’t right for the gig and should have been brave enough to say so up front. After a week of attempts and back-and-forth communication, the producer finally arrived at the same conclusion I knew seven days prior.

Fortunately, I’ve worked with the same producer on other projects since. I cannot be everything to all my clients. I know my strengths.

  1. Open to Direction

When you receive comments from a client, do you ever feel like you’ve failed? Creating spoken audio is a process. We hope that we have all the details up front and will utter the words as described. A client might come back with a list of things to change that are clearly non-script issues.

Your client wants to work with you and is listening for the best performance possible. When receiving feedback, take it with an open mind. Ask questions when necessary. Offer solutions not roadblocks. Above all, be professional.

Your client will appreciate working with a voice talent that is not wildly sensitive to criticism.

  1. Exceptional Delivery

You’ve probably heard or read the phrase, “Under-promise and over-deliver”. This is about making sure client expectations are clearly set and then exceeding them. It could be as simple as delivering audio files ahead of schedule, or providing two different takes of a script instead of one.

This will enhance your value in the eyes of your client and that’s a good thing.

  1. What’s Next?

Clients appreciate being kept in the loop and updated appropriately. Let them know the steps of your workflow and what will happen next in the creation process. Hold their hand and get them from one step to the next.

Do you send project confirmations for clients to approve? Include a “What’s Next” section that explains what happens after their approval.

Something along, “Once I get your approval, session time will be locked in for your project.” This does a couple of things. It clearly puts the process in their possession and it lets the client know what is dependent upon their approval.

  1. Not as it Appears

Since we primarily work remotely from our clients, it’s easy to misunderstand actions and intentions or what could be perceived as misbehavior. In most cases, it’s wise to give them some space to be human.

Are they slow to respond to your e-mail or calls? Is their invoice still unpaid? An unavoidable event could be the roadblock. Life happens, so give them an opportunity to respond and take care of whatever it is that’s bugging you.

  1. Worth Every Penny

Do you know what you are worth? How much does your time and skill cost? Do you have established rates? It’s wise to know what type of work you’ll be doing and how long it takes to complete it, and it’s even more crucial to know what to charge for your services and feel good about it.

Don’t short yourself thinking a prospect might look elsewhere. Know your worth and stick to it! Once the numbers are agreed upon, it will be difficult to negotiate for more later.

As a Reminder

You are in business for yourself. You are a freelance voiceover artist who makes money by reading other people’s words. It’s fun and you enjoy doing it. Be professional and treat your clients with a healthy dose of support, appreciation and gratitude.

© 2014 J. Christopher Dunn

Other posts you might find interesting:

Your Next Client Could be a Return Call Away

Five Tips for Better Client/Talent Workflow

Are You Available?

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